• Black Billed Magpie, Colorado - Photo by Wayne D. Lewis
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Feb 13

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Grant to Restore Lesser Prairie-Chick...

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) has awarded a grant to the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) to restore habitat to benefit the lesser prairie-chicken. The grant, which totals $197,309.25, is being funded through NFWF’s ConocoPhillips SPIRIT of Conservation and Innovation Program.

“We appreciate our partnership with NFWF and ConocoPhillips and look forward to applying these funds as we continue to implement the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Plan,” said Alexa Sandoval, Director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and Chairman of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative Council. “Restoration work is key to the long-term survival of the bird and this grant will contribute to the combined efforts to keep the bird off the endangered species list.”

The bird was listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 2014, but was de-listed in 2016 after a federal judge ruled on a lawsuit and vacated protections for the bird. The judge ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did not thoroughly consider active conservation efforts in making the listing decision, namely the activities associated with WAFWA’s Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-Wide Plan. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife is currently reviewing the status of the lesser prairie-chicken across its five-state range to determine whether it should be listed again.

The NFWF grant will fund restoration work on up to 1,000 acres of private land that will connect larger fragmented pieces of prairie-chicken habitat. Contiguous tracts of good habitat create better conditions for the bird.

“The range-wide plan calls for us to focus our efforts as strategically as possible,” said Bill Van Pelt, WAFWA Grassland Coordinator. “By connecting good bird habitat, more acreage will be available for the birds to thrive.”

The range-wide plan is a collaborative effort of WAFWA and the state wildlife agencies of Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It was developed to ensure conservation of the lesser prairie-chicken by providing a mechanism for voluntary cooperation by landowners and industry and improving coordination between state and federal conservation agencies. Funding for WAFWA’s conservation efforts comes from voluntary mitigation payments by industry partners that are enrolled in the plan, along with grants from partners like NFWF. The plan allows agriculture producers and industry to continue operations while reducing impacts to the bird and its grassland habitat.

 

WAFWA news releases available at www.wafwa.org/news/

More info about NFWF’s ConocoPhillips SPIRIT of Conservation and Innovation Program: www.nfwf.org/spirit/Pages/home.aspx

Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Conservation Plan can be found HERE

Media contact: Bill Van Pelt
602-717-5066
bill.vanpelt@wafwa.org

Photo Credit: Grant Beauprez

Since 1922, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) has advanced conservation in western North America. Representing 23 western states and Canadian provinces, WAFWA’s reach encompasses more than 40 percent of North America, including two-thirds of the United States. Drawing on the knowledge of scientists across the West, WAFWA is recognized as the expert source for information and analysis about western wildlife. WAFWA supports sound resource management and building partnerships at all levels to conserve wildlife for the use and benefit of all citizens, now and in the future.


Feb 02

Issue 4 : February 2017

View the fourth official WAFWA Newsletter.


Jan 05

WAFWA Secures First Conservation Easement for Lesser Prairie-Chicken Habita...

The Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) has finalized permanent conservation agreements with a private landowner to conserve 1,781 acres of high-quality lesser prairie-chicken habitat in south-central Kansas. This is the first permanent conservation easement in the mixed-grass prairie region secured as part of the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Plan.
The conserved acreage is all native rangeland currently being managed for livestock production, and this historical use will continue. The property is occupied by lesser prairie-chickens and is located within one of the highest priority conservation areas identified in the range-wide plan.
The transactions includes a conservation easement purchased by WAFWA and held by Pheasants Forever that legally restricts future development and activities that would be detrimental to the habitat for the bird. All other property rights associated with historical use of the land will be retained by the private landowner. WAFWA has also established an endowment that will provide the landowner with sufficient payments to implement a lesser prairie-chicken conservation plan in perpetuity. This transaction not only permanently protects key prairie habitat but also ensures that this property will remain a working cattle ranch.
“This conservation easement is another milestone in the successful implementation of the range-wide plan and will permanently secure important habitat that the birds need to thrive,” said Roger Wolfe, WAFWA’s Lesser Prairie-Chicken Program Manager. “We appreciate the collaboration with Pheasants Forever, our industry partners who are funding this effort, and the conservation-minded landowner who has made this possible.”

“It took a lot of work on the part of WAFWA, Pheasants Forever and ourselves to find a balance between the needs of the lesser prairie-chicken and maintaining historical use of the land,” said Tom Hammond, manager of the property. “The result is an innovative approach that acknowledges and rewards landowners for permanently conserving large tracts of habitat, while maintaining the integrity of the land for the long-term benefit of the landowner and the species. There is high quality habitat there now because we have managed the range properly for both grazing and wildlife. These agreements make sure that approach remains in place forever.”
The range-wide plan is a collaborative effort of WAFWA and the state wildlife agencies of Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas. It was developed to ensure conservation of the lesser prairie-chicken by providing a mechanism for voluntary cooperation by landowners and industry and improving coordination between state and federal conservation agencies. Funding for WAFWA’s conservation efforts comes from voluntary mitigation payments by industry partners that are enrolled in the plan. The plan allows agriculture producers and industry to continue operations while reducing impacts to the bird and its grassland habitat. Landowners interested in participating in one of the short-term, long-term or permanent conservation options available under the Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Plan should contact Roger Wolfe at roger.wolfe@wafwa.org

WAFWA news releases available at http://www.wafwa.org/news/

Lesser Prairie-Chicken Range-wide Plan can be found HERE

Since 1922, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) has advanced conservation in western North America. Representing 23 western states and Canadian provinces, WAFWA’s reach encompasses more than 40 percent of North America, including two-thirds of the United States. Drawing on the knowledge of scientists across the West, WAFWA is recognized as the expert source for information and analysis about western wildlife. WAFWA supports sound resource management and building partnerships at all levels to conserve wildlife for the use and benefit of all citizens, now and in the future.

Photo Credit: Grant Beauprez


Dec 01

Issue 3 : December 2016

View the third official WAFWA Newsletter.


Sep 12

Grants Benefiting Native Trout Awarded in Seven Western States

The Western Native Trout Initiative (WNTI) has awarded $31,965 out of its small grant program for 12 projects, which will be matched by $468,575 in other public and private funding. More than $500,000 in conservation efforts benefitting western native trout will occur as a result.

An initiative of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, WNTI, is a collaborative, multi-state, multi-partner effort that builds on the conservation needs of the many native trout species described in species conservation and recovery plans in the 12 western states where they can be found.

“We’re very grateful to our partners at Bass Pro Shops, Orvis, Sierra Pacific Fly Fishers, Blue Valley Ranch, and all our individual donors for supporting our 2016 Small Grants Program,” said Therese Thompson, WNTI Project Coordinator. “Over the last few years of funding, this grant program has consistently brought in some of the most innovative community-based project proposals that are making a difference for native trout conservation across the western U.S.”

Project summaries:

Arizona: Arizona's Apache Trout - Get to Know Your Native 
Applicant: Arizona Council, Trout Unlimited                                                                                                Amount: $1,500
This project is a coordinated education and outreach effort focusing on raising awareness for the native Apache Trout in Arizona. 

California: Lahontan Cutthroat Trout recovery interpretive panel  
Applicant: Southwest Council of the International Federation of Fly Fishers                                          Amount: $1,500
This grant will fund an interpretive panel design/construction to inform and educate the public about the negative impacts of illegal stocking on native ecosystems, and urge fishermen to participate in the Heritage Trout Program, a program designed by California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife to restore opportunities for anglers to catch California's native trout.

Colorado: Restoration of Colorado's State Fish, the Greenback Cutthroat Trout     
Applicant: Colorado Trout Unlimited                                                                                                               Amount: $3,000
This project will support increased survival of Greenback Cutthroat Trout raised in state and federal hatcheries, and provide outreach about the efforts to restore the Greenback Cutthroat Trout to the South Platte River Basin. 

Colorado: Trout on Tejon    
Applicant: Cheyenne Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited                                                                      Amount: $3,000
This project is one component of a multi-pronged outreach effort to the Colorado Springs, Colorado, community about Greenback Cutthroat Trout and specifically the population of 600 Greenbacks that reside in Bear Creek, just outside of Colorado Springs. 

Colorado: Bear Creek Watershed/Jones Park Restoration: Directional and Interpretive Signage     
Applicant: El Paso County, Colorado                                                                                                               Amount: $3,000
WNTI funds will be used to design, purchase and install 20 directional signs and two interpretive panels incorporating educational information designed to show the relationship of the Greenback Cutthroat Trout and its aquatic habitat to the surrounding ecosystems and recreational opportunities.

Montana: Sucker Creek Westslope Cutthroat Trout Passage Project     
Applicant: Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited                                                                                    Amount: $3,000
This project will restore access to 1.5 miles of habitat and is part of a larger effort in the Blackfoot Watershed to work collaboratively across the watershed with a diverse group of stakeholders.

Montana: Dry Cottonwood Cross-boundary Trout Conservation      
Applicant: Clark Fork Coalition                                                                                                                         Amount: $3,000
This project will address fish passage and habitat quality issues on private and public lands within the 23-square mile Dry Cottonwood drainage of the Upper Clark Fork River. 

Montana: Temperature and Sediment Reduction to Improve Stream Health and Fish Habitat     
Applicant: Bitter Root Water Forum                                                                                                                Amount: $3,000
This project’s goal is to effectively enhance and restore Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Bull Trout habitat along more than one mile of over-grazed land on the East Fork of the Bitterroot River. 

Nevada: Exploration Lahontan Cutthroat Trout (LCT) Camp   
Applicant: Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum                                                                               Amount: $3,000
The core objective of this grant is to further develop, replicate and successfully deliver two additional weeks of the 5‐day “Exploration LCT” Camp in fall 2016 and/or spring 2017. 

Oregon: Bum Creek Instream Restoration     
Applicant: Smith River Watershed Council                                                                                                     Amount: $3,000
This is the final phase of a multi-year collaborative effort to rehabilitate aquatic habitat conditions and aquatic populations in Bum Creek, Oregon.

Oregon: Sprague River Restoration 2016    
Applicant: Klamath Lake Land Trust                                                                                                                Amount: $3,000
The project will add high-quality, complex habitat to an agricultural area that is otherwise marginal habitat. This section of the Sprague River is home to Upper Klamath Basin Redband Trout and is a migration route for Bull Trout and 10 other species of concern.

Washington: Redband Trout Thermal Habitat Assessment     
Applicant: Spokane Riverkeeper/Center for Justice                                                                                     Amount: $1,965
The Spokane Riverkeeper will conduct a temperature study that will provide a reach by reach assessment of thermal regimes in order to prioritize the restoration of stream habitat that supports Columbia Basin interior Redband Trout

Media Contact:
Therese Thompson, 303.236.4402
tthompson@westernnativetrout.org

For more information about the Small Grants Program, visit www.westernnativetrout.org

Since 1922, the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) has advanced conservation in western North America. Representing 23 western states and Canadian provinces, WAFWA’s reach encompasses more than 40 percent of North America, including two-thirds of the United States. Drawing on the knowledge of scientists across the West, WAFWA is recognized as the expert source for information and analysis about western wildlife. WAFWA supports sound resource management and building partnerships at all levels to conserve wildlife for the use and benefit of all citizens, now and in the future.  


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