Program

The following schedule is subject to change (as of 7/20/2016); please check back for updates. Plenary Session details are at the bottom of this page; scroll down to review. 

All meetings will be held in the Holiday Inn at the Buffalo Bill Village Resort, unless listed as "Offsite" on the schedule. 

Thursday, July 21

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Colorado River Fish and Wildlife Council

Taggarts 1

3:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Registration Desk Open

Main Hotel Lobby

5:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavilion

Friday, July 22

6:00 am – 5:00 pm

Directors and Commissioners Retreats and Joint Meeting

Offsite

7:00 am – 7:00 pm

Registration Desk Open (Business Center opens at 12:00 pm)

Main Hotel Lobby

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Guest Gathering

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Western Native Trout Initiative

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Aquatic Invasive Species Working Group

Two Dot/Pitchfork

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Directors’ and Commissioners’ Reception and Dinner
Sponsored by Mule Deer Foundation

Offsite

5:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavilion

Saturday, July 23

6:15 am – 8:30 am

Attendee Breakfast Buffet

Outdoor Pavilion

7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Desk / Business Center Open

Main Hotel Lobby

7:00 am – 5:30 pm Guest Activity: Yellowstone National Park: Behind the Scenes (details)
($40 - transportation, lunch, snacks, beverages, and park entrance fee included in price)

Offsite

7:00 am – 12:00 pm

Wildlife and Law Enforcement Chiefs Combined Meeting

Offsite

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Guest Gathering

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Sagebrush Executive Oversight Committee

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Commissioners’ Committee Meeting

Taggarts 1 & 2

8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Fisheries Chiefs Meeting

Offsite

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Exhibitor Setup

Ballroom Prefunction

9:30 am – 10:30 am

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Directors’ Lunch (Invitation Only)
Sponsored by Kalkomey Enterprises

Bottoms-up Lounge

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Attendee Lunch

Outdoor Pavilion

12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Exhibits Open

Ballroom Prefunction

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Wildlife Chiefs Meeting

Bandana

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Law Enforcement Chiefs Meeting

Pitchfork/Bobcat

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Legal Committee Executive Session

Taggarts 3

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Directors’ Forum

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

5:30 pm – 10:30 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavilion

Sunday, July 24

7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Desk / Business Center Open

Main Hotel Lobby

7:00 am – 8:00 am

Directors’ Breakfast (Invitation Only)
Sponsored by National Wild Turkey Federation

Bottoms-up Lounge

7:00 am – 8:30 am

Attendee Breakfast Buffet

Outdoor Pavilion

7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Exhibits Open

Ballroom Prefunction

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Guest Gathering

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Western Quail Working Group

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Lesser Prairie-Chicken Initiative Council

Bob Cat

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Legal Committee Meeting

Taggarts 3

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Wild Sheep Working Group

Taggarts 1

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Northern Great Plains Grasslands Meeting (Invitation Only)

Bandana

8:00 am – 4:30 pm Guest Activity: Heart Mountain Hike and Relocation Center Tour (details)
(Tour Only: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm)
($20 Hike + Tour - transportation, lunch, snacks, and beverages included in price) ($5 Tour Only - transportation and entrance fee included in price)

Offsite

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Resource Information & Education Committee

Two Dot/Pitchfork

9:00 am – 12:00 pm

Inland & Marine Fisheries Committee

Taggarts 2

9:30 am – 10:30 am

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

10:00 am – 11:00 am

Lead and Wildlife Ad Hoc Working Group

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Attendee Lunch

Outdoor Pavilion

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Human Dimensions Committee

Two Dot/Pitchfork

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Habitat Committee

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Law Enforcement Committee

Bob Cat

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Wildlife Health Committee

Bandana

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Mule Deer Working Group

Taggarts 1

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Climate Change Committee

Taggarts 3

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm Wildlife Chiefs Wolverine Subcommittee

Two Dot/Pitchfork

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Budget, Finance and Compliance Committee

Taggarts 2

6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Welcome Reception at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West Museum
Sponsored by Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

Offsite

8:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavillion

Monday, July 25

7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Registration Desk / Business Center Open

Main Hotel Lobby

7:00 am – 5:00 pm

Exhibits Open

Ballroom Prefunction

7:00 am – 8:00 am

Directors’ ESA-SARA Working Group Breakfast (Invitation Only)

Taggarts 1

7:00 am – 8:30 am

Attendee Breakfast Buffet

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Guest Gathering

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 12:00 pm

Plenary Session (details)

Main Ballroom

9:30 am – 10:30 am

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by National Rifle Association

Ballroom Prefunction

10:00 am – 4:00 pm Guest Activity: Big Horn Canyon Scenic Boat Tour (details)
($55 - transportation, hot lunch, snacks, beverages (including wine), and tour fee included in price)

Offsite

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Directors’ Lunch (Invitation Only)
Sponsored by Ducks Unlimited

Bottoms-up Lounge

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Human/Wildlife Conflicts Committee

Taggarts 3

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Western Bird Conservation Committee

Two Dot/Pitchfork

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Hunter, Angler, Shooting Sports, & Wildlife Recreation Participation Committee

Taggarts 1

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

State/Federal/Tribal Communications Committee: Challenges and Opportunities of Working Collaboratively on Fish and Wildlife Issues

Panelists:
  • Jim Unsworth, WDFW Director and Committee Chair
  • Ron Skates, South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks Tribal Liaison
  • Shawn Yanity, Stillaguamish Tribal Chairman
  • Rick Kahn, Wildlife Biologist, National Park Service
  • Fred Matt, Executive Director, Native American Fish and Wildlife Society (and former chair of the confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes)
  • Pat Hnilicka, Project Leader, Lander Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office (USFWS)

Taggarts 2

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

CHAT Technical Leads Meeting

Sasparilla Saloon

1:30 pm – 5:00 pm

Nongame & Endangered Species Committee

Bandana

2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Executive Committee

Taggarts 3

5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

WAFWA Awards Reception

Main Ballroom

6:30 pm – 9:00 pm

BBQ Dinner at Cody Auditorium (1240 Beck Avenue, Cody, WY) - new location!

Offsite

9:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavilion

Tuesday, July 26

8:00 am – 1:00 pm

Registration Desk / Business Center Open

Main Hotel Lobby

7:00 am – 8:00 am

Resolutions Committee Breakfast

QT’s Restaurant

7:00 am – 8:30 am

Attendee Breakfast Buffet

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Guest Gathering

Outdoor Pavilion

8:00 am – 9:00 am

Nominating, Time and Place Committee

Bob Cat

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Legislative Committee

Hoo Doo/TE Ranch

8:00 am – 10:00 am

Private Lands Access & Conservation Committee

Two Dot/Pitchfork

8:00 am – 10:00 am

CHAT Policy Group

Bandana

9:30 am – 10:30 am

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

10:00 am – 5:00 pm

WAFWA Annual Business Meeting

Taggarts

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Directors’ Lunch (Invitation Only)
Sponsored by Intermountain West Joint Venture

Bottoms-up Lounge

2:30 – 3:30 pm

Refreshment Break

Ballroom Prefunction

5:00 – 10:00 pm

Hospitality Suite Open

Outdoor Pavilion


Plenary Session Details:

Monday, July 25 • Main Ballroom

8:00 am

Presentation of Colors
American Legion, Cody Wyoming

National Anthems of U.S. and Canada
Erica Flom, Executive Director, One Shot Foundation

Roll Call

8:15 am

Welcome Pardners!
Scott Talbott, Director, Wyoming Game & Fish Department

8:25 am

Celebrate Partnerships in Conservation and the Centennial of the National Park Service
Arthur Middleton, Wildlife Ecologist; Joe Riis, Photographer

9:15 am

Mending Fences: Where We Can Go To Improve Partnerships
Governor Dave Freudenthal, Wyoming

9:50 am

Making State and Federal Relationships Work, A View from the East
Nick Wiley, Director, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

10:00 am

Break

10:05 am

What Works in a Partnership: How NGOs and State Agencies Get it Done
David Allen, CEO, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

10:25 am

Landowners and Landscapes: Working for Wildlife
Jim Stone, Chairman, Partners for Conservation

10:40 am

Conservation Banking: An Innovative Partnership
Ryan Lance, Sweetwater River Conservatory

11:00 am

Working Across for Borders to Benefit Habitat and Wildlife
David Smith, Intermountain West Joint Venture

11:15 am

The Black-footed Ferret: A Partnership Producing Results on the Plains

12:10 pm

Wrap-up

 

Plenary Presenters:

DAVID ALLEN
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

A lifelong conservationist with a deep passion for elk and hunting, Allen began his career as Media Director for the Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association and served as Director of Special Events for Wrangler Jeans. He went on to create his own sports marketing agency where he directed marketing and sponsorships for the Dale Earnhardt/Richard Childress race teams and other NASCAR teams until Dale’s death in 2001 at the Daytona 500. Allen has spent 33 years marketing pro rodeo, the Pro Bull Riders Tour and NASCAR, and served on the board of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation. Allen brings a profound admiration for the foundation’s 10,000 dedicated volunteers. “Serving on the RMEF’s Board of Directors, I came to recognize our volunteers as real-life heroes of wildlife conservation in this country,” he says. “For no payment other than satisfaction, they put on our Big Game Banquets, roll up old barbed-wire fence, build water guzzlers, seed and reseed lands after fires and a host of other work—all on behalf of elk and other wildlife. They are the kind of conservationists Theodore Roosevelt would brag about. My goal is to give them all the tools they need to make the greatest possible difference.” Born and raised in Deadwood, South Dakota, he studied journalism at the University of Wyoming and now makes his home with his wife and two sons in Billings, Montana.

KRISTY BLY
World Wildlife Federation

As Senior Wildlife Conservation Biologist for WWF’s Northern Great Plains Program, Bly works to conserve and restore populations of and habitat for black-footed ferrets, black-tailed prairie dogs and swift foxes in the North American Great Plains. She develops and oversees programs and staff for these focal species and engages and maintains relationships with partners, stakeholders, policy makers and donors. Kristy came to WWF in July 2007 from the Turner Endangered Species Fund, where she led the black-tailed prairie dog and black-footed ferret restoration program on the Bad River Ranches in central South Dakota. From 1994 to 2007, she contributed to grizzly bear, lynx and wolf research in the Northern Rockies and Yellowstone National Park and worked to restore condors, prairie dogs, black-footed ferrets and swift foxes to the desert southwest and the grasslands of South Dakota. Kristy holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Wildlife Biology and Management from the University of Rhode Island and a Master’s degree in Ecology from Montana State University.

JOHN EMMERICH
Friends of Black-Footed Ferrets, Retired Wyoming Game & Fish Department

John Emmerich retired as the Deputy Director of External Operations of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. Over his careeer, John did habitat management for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the rainwater basin of south central Nebraska and was a line officer in the US Navy. His career with Wyoming Game and Fish began in 1978. He has served the Department as contract biologist collecting baseline wildlife data in the Powder River Basin and south-central Wyoming, Wildlife Biologist in Lander, Wyoming, working extensively with sage grouse and big game, coordinating the annual Whiskey Basin Bighorn Sheep trap and transplant program, as Wildlife Management Coordinator in Cody, Wyoming, supervising the terrestrial wildlife management program for the Bighorn Basin including grizzly bear recovery efforts and offsite mitigation for the North Fork Highway project. John graduated from the University of Wyoming with a BS degree in Wildlife Management and South Dakota State University with an MS in Wildlife Biology. John is married has 3 children and enjoys traveling, spending time with his children and bird hunting. He currently spends time working with the Black-Footed Ferrets Friends organization to further conservation and recovery of one of North America’s most endangered mammals

DAVE FREUDENTHAL
Former Governor, State of Wyoming

Governor Freudenthal is a Wyoming native who served two terms as Wyoming’s 31st governor. In 2002, Freudenthal, a Democrat and first-time candidate, won an upset victory in one of America’s most overwhelmingly Republican states. After his first term, he was re-elected in 2006 by the greatest percentage in the State’s history. By the end of his tenure, Wyoming was ranked as the “Best Run State in America” and he left his successor with a balanced budget and a billion-dollar surplus. Freudenthal’s eight years were marked by a constructive bi-partisan relationship, which moved Wyoming forward on many fronts. As the nation’s least populous state, Wyoming maintains a resource-based economy, relying primarily on mineral and energy extraction, tourism and agriculture for its economic livelihood. Recognizing the strengths and opportunities that this economic base represented for the state, Freudenthal’s administration focused on balancing resource extraction and preservation with regulatory approaches designed to enhance long-term growth. Governor Freudenthal spearheaded legislation and funding for economic and community development initiatives, the funding of the Cultural Trust Fund for the arts, creation of the Wildlife and Natural Resources Trust Fund, and establishment of the School of Energy Resources at the University of Wyoming. Along with Bass Pro Shop founder, Johnny Morris, Governor Freudenthal is co-chair of AFWA’s new, national Blue Ribbon Panel on Sustaining America’s Fish and Wildlife Resources to advance recommendations for funding a 21st century model of conservation. The Blue Ribbon Panel is the first effort to bring business, energy, conservation and environmental interests to the table to focus on funding a 21st century model of conservation to sustain the full array of fish and wildlife species for our country.” Dave and his wife, Nancy, have four children and live in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

DR. PETE GOBER
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Gober has worked for the Service for 27 years and is the Black-footed Ferret Recovery Coordinator stationed at the Black-footed Ferret Recovery Center in Wellington, Colorado. As the recovery coordinator, Gober works with a wide array of federal agencies, state and county governments, Native American tribes, private citizens, landowners, and non-governmental organizations; to recover the endangered Black-footed Ferret throughout its former range in the Great Plains, mountain basins, and semi-arid grasslands of North America.

DR. SHAUN GRASSEL
Lower Brule Sioux Tribe

Shaun Grassel is a Wildlife Biologist for the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. Shaun has worked for the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe for nearly 20 years on prairie species conservation and management including being the project leader for the Tribe’s prairie dog and black-footed ferret programs. Shaun also worked in the inland Northwest on salmon recovery for 2 years. Shaun has B.S. and M.S. degrees in Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences from South Dakota State University and a Ph.D in Natural Resources from the University of Idaho.

TODD HEWARD
Wyoming Rancher

Heward was born and raised on the family ranch in Shirley Basin, WY. The ranch sits in one of the last remaining intact grasslands in the world. The ranch was homesteaded by Heward’s family in 1909. The family continues to run cattle and sheep there. Heward earned an associate’s degree from Ricks College, Rexburg, ID in Animal Science and a B.S. from the University of Wyoming in Rangeland Ecology and Watershed Management. Heward is passionate about conservation because it provides me the opportunity to improve the sustainability of the ranch, and helps to increase the resiliency of ranch resources. The Heward family supported black-footed ferret recovery by hosting the very first reintroduction of ferrets back into the wild in 1991. A population of ferrets remains on the ranch to this day.

RYAN LANCE
Sweetwater River Conservancy

Prior to joining SRC, Ryan served as the director of the Wyoming Office of State Lands and Investments for Wyoming Governor Matthew H. Mead. In that capacity, he administered 3.5 million surface acres and 3.9 million mineral acres of state trust lands on behalf of the Wyoming Board of Land Commissioners. He also was tasked with directing over $100 million in biennial grant and loan funding for local government infrastructure projects through the Wyoming State Loan and Investment Board. Before his work with Governor Mead, Ryan served as state planning coordinator, deputy chief of staff, policy advisor and Endangered Species Act policy coordinator in the administration of Governor Dave Freudenthal. In these capacities, he directed policy development and implementation related to natural resource matters with Wyoming state agencies, including the Department of Environmental Quality, Game and Fish Department, Department of Agriculture, State Engineer’s Office and Water Development Office. Ryan also served as the Governor’s policy liaison to federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Department of Agriculture. While working for Governor Freudenthal, Ryan helped devise the governor’s core area strategy for managing greater sage grouse and its habitat in Wyoming, supported state efforts to achieve recovery and final delisting of the grizzly bear and bald eagle and advised industry and state agencies regarding compliance with the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

ARTHUR MIDDLETON
Wildlife Ecologist

Arthur is a research scientist at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a research associate of both the Wyoming Migration Initiative and the Draper Museum of Natural History at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. He works on the ecology of predator-prey interactions and animal movements, with current field projects in the Rocky and Andes Mountains. In addition to his research, Arthur is interested in improving science communication and ecosystem management in the landscapes where he works. He completed his Ph.D. in 2012 at the University of Wyoming, where he studied the interactions of wolves and elk in the Absaroka Range and developed friendships with the communities of the Absaroka Front. Along with Joe Riis, Arthur was awarded the 2013 Camp Monaco Prize by Prince Albert II of Monaco for linking research and public outreach on the subject of trans-boundary wildlife migrations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The Camp Monaco Prize provided the seed funding and inspiration that allowed Joe and Arthur to initiate this evolving project. Arthur will begin a new position in wildlife ecology, management and policy at the University of California, Berkeley in mid-2016.

KEN MORGAN
Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Ken Morgan is the Private Lands Program Manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife. In that position, he manages and coordinates species conservation programs across CPW as they relate to private lands habitat. He coordinates with CPW species conservation specialists to facilitate and implement species conservation priorities with private landowners and state agricultural organizations. In addition, he serves as the official CPW Farm Bill Program representative to public and private interests at the local, state, and national levels. He provides expertise to Colorado NRCS, FSA, and CPW staffs regarding policy and implementation of Farm Bill Programs to maximize conservation benefits for wildlife resources. Ken serves as a member of the NRCS State Technical Committee, is chair of the wildlife sub-committee of the State Technical Committee and assists with the development of systems, guidelines, budgets and plans for Colorado Farm Bill programs and practices. He represents the CPW in Farm Bill policy development regionally and nationally through membership and participation in the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Access and Private Lands Working Group, and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Policy Analyst position in D.C.

JOE RIIS
Photographer

Joe is a National Geographic contributing photographer and photography fellow at the Wyoming Migration Initiative. He has been working in the Greater Yellowstone since early 2008, focusing primarily on wildlife migration. From his experience on a personal passion project about the Grand Teton Pronghorn Migration, to several recent National Geographic assignments, Joe knows how to tell this story. While the Absaroka Range is one of the most rugged landscapes where Joe has worked, he is no stranger to challenging terrain, having photographed wildlife in regions as diverse as the Mongolian desert and the Mexican jungle. Joe’s work photographing the elk migrations and contributing to Elk River and Invisible Boundaries represent the culmination of 8 years working on these themes in the Greater Yellowstone.

DAVID SMITH
Intermountain West Joint Venture

As the Intermountain West Joint Venture Coordinator, Dave serves a diverse, executive-level Management Board comprised of representatives from state fish and wildlife agencies, federal agencies, NGOs, corporations, and private landowners. His key role is to expand partnerships and funding for sciencebased, landscape-scale, habitat conservation. Dave brings to the table expertise in habitat protection, restoration, and management from 25 years of experience with the IWJV, a state fish and wildlife agency, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, and a nongovernmental conservation organization. Prior to the IWJV, Dave assembled several Farm Bill initiatives while with NRCS in Montana, developed a 37,000-acre state private lands habitat program, established the Landowner Incentive Program and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Programs in California, and delivered a state wetlands conservation easement program. Dave holds a B.S. in Wildlife Management from California State University, Chico.

JIM STONE
Partners for Conservation

Jim is a third generation cattle rancher from the small town of Ovando in Western Montana. The Rolling Stone Ranch black angus cow/calf operation relies on son Brady, when not in school, to provide a stable and energetic vision to maintaining a valuable and picturesque landscape. The Stones believe in a strong tradition of rural communities, land ethics and working together to foster change that will benefit generations to come. The ranch operates on the premise that people are our most valuable asset: partnerships are critical to the daily operations and the ability to leverage knowledge and science to achieve their goals. Jim is actively involved in the Blackfoot Challenge, a local watershed organization, the Big Blackfoot Chapter of Trout Unlimited, North Powell Conservation District, Ovando School Board, and the Ovando Fire Department. Jim is Chairman of Partners for Conservation (www.partnersforconservtion.org), a national landowner-led group that works on issues of communication and collaboration to sustain our national working landscapes for both people and nature.

SCOTT TALBOTT
Wyoming Game & Fish Department

Scott was appointed as Director of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2011. Scott is a third generation Wyoming native. He grew up and worked on the family ranch outside of Laramie, Wyoming. He felled timber and sheared sheep until graduating from the University of Wyoming in 1984. In the spring of 1985, Scott began his career with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department as a upland game bird and waterfowl habitat technician. He has worked in various capacities across the state including habitat and access construction crew, elk feeder, game warden, wildlife investigator, damage control warden, regional wildlife supervisor and deputy chief of the wildlife division. Scott is a 2011 graduate of the National Conservation Leadership Institute, (NCLI), and serves on the Board of Directors for the NCLI. He is a 2014 Graduate of Leadership Wyoming. He currently serves as President of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Scott is an avid outdoorsman who loves Wyoming and its natural resources. He spends his spare time hunting and fishing with his two sons Payden and Luke. Scott enjoys training horses and going on backcountry pack trips in the remote mountains of Wyoming. He remains actively involved in the family’s ranching operation.

NICK WILEY
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Nick Wiley is a Certified Wildlife Biologist employed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) as Executive Director. He has over 30 years of professional experience in fish and wildlife management, mostly in Florida. Mr. Wiley has served as a field biologist and in leadership roles in several FWC programs including alligator management, game management, and conservation lands management. He is a Fellow of the National Conservation Leadership Institute and a professional member of the Boone and Crockett Club. Mr. Wiley is a Georgia native and has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology from Georgia Southern University and a Master of Science Degree in Wildlife Science from Auburn University.

 


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