Human/Wildlife Conflicts

Capacity Building Workshop: Transforming Conservation Conflicts 
Offered by the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration

Conservation conflicts significantly threaten wildlife populations, destabilize communities, undermine governance, and negatively impact communities’ sense of cultural, social, economic, and emotional security and identity. As a peacebuilding organization working in the wildlife conservation sector, the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration (HWCC) transforms deep-rooted, complex social conflict in wildlife conservation and management efforts to create durable solutions for people and wildlife. HWCC’s efforts result in a reconciliation of the social conflicts undermining successful conservation and management of wildlife to ensure that conservation solutions are socially, ecologically, economically, and politically robust and sustainable. 

HWCC employs a unique and innovative Conservation Conflict Transformation (CCT) approach. This application of conflict transformation to conservation conflicts was derived from a suite of scientific disciplines and research in neurology, psychology, sociology, anthropology, peacebuilding, business development, behavioral economics, systems theory, complexity science, and others. The integration of CCT results in consistently positive feedback and outcomes, as reported by stakeholders, governments, and communities. 

Within the capacity building workshop, HWCC’s collaborative learning process addresses the theory, principles, and practice of transforming complex conservation conflicts. Participants draw on best practices from both conservation and identity-based (deep-rooted) conflict resolution. This allows participants to improve their capacity to analyze complex conflict dynamics, anticipate and address conflicts as they arise, and address long-standing conflicts that may impede new progress. By accurately analyzing conflicts and facilitating appropriate processes for addressing them, professionals can determine root causes, build a foundation for trust and respect among stakeholders, and unearth fertile ground for sowing and cultivating sustainable conservation solutions.

For more information on upcoming capacity building workshops, please contact Amy Masching at amy@humanwildlifeconflict.org.